Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Notes on Strand Bookstore

 
We made our visit to the Strand Bookstore in New York City recently. Our Fellows seemed to really enjoy the experience. They provided a few reflections on their experience.
The Strand Bookstore is a compelling, universal center of intellectual power. Not only can the resource be used for research and academic pursuits, but the store features a diverse selection of reading materials that can appeal to the diverse interests of educators,  writers, musicians and others. An English Education major should visit the Strand Bookstore because it provides a wealth of resources to enhance one's critical thinking skills through the wide selection of books and other educational resources. --Candace Chambers

18 miles and 4 floors of "nerdy" paper goodness, the Strand Bookstore caters to any scholar or book enthusiast! I was extremely impressed not only by how many books were there but also by the rare book collection and the helpful staff. Everyone should visit the store and spend a little time to find classic texts for their collection or find new books to explore.  --Alesia Alexander
The strand bookstore serves a unique place in the culture and value system of New York. It's presence and thriving existence exemplifies New York's value on the importance of reading and the further expansion of knowledge, from the classics to the contemporary. It's strong tradition to not only sell books that are used and books that are new further shows it's mission to preserve and promote the need of texts that will forever change society. --Deontez Wimbley

The moment I entered The Strand book store I was overwhelmed with joy from the large number of books present. As an avid reader and lover of words, I felt like a "kid in a candy store" and had no idea where to began tackling this store which holds eight-teen miles of books. The most wonderful parts about visiting The Strand are, even among four floors of literature, I was able to identify each section, not get lost, and find scholarly book that you only over hear professors discussing. --Amber Walker

Eighteen miles of books, but more sentences, and more words: The Strand is truly a unique place in the Union Square area. Independent bookstores are a dying breed, but amongst academics, that rare book—limited edition—signed copy of a Joyce or Wright work is worth the commute and more importantly the price. The atmosphere—filled with fiction lovers, sci-fi geeks, and Shakespeare fiends—is rare because everyone has a passion for knowledge and creativity, and as a scholar being surrounding by those attributes is essential to crafting our own works and studies. ​--Josalynn J. Smith


Related:
AALCI 2014

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AALCI in New York City 2014

We traveled with our 5th cohort on our annual scholarly excursion to New York City. What follows are a few images from the trip.




Moody's photos of Rambsy

I'm usually the one taking photographs, but here are a couple that Joycelyn Moody snapped of me while we were at the African Burial Ground in NYC.




Related:
AALCI 2014

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Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Poster presentations

Today, our Fellows organized a poster presentation where they shared aspects of their developing research projects.










More information on presentations 
Alesia Alexander
Candace Chambers
Mariah Hill
Josalynn Smith
Amber Walker

Related:
AALCI 2014

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Deontez Wimbley's poster presentation


By Deontez Wimbley

My research is concerned with how literal young gay men interpret scripture, and how does that interpretation of scripture affect either negatively or positively their attitude towards sexuality. I am very interested in the population of young men who have exhibit a high level or scriptural literalism and a high positive attitude toward sexuality. My interest is situated around he how they negotiate scriptures that explicitly have references to homosexuality and have been traditionally used by the Christian church as evidence for why homosexuality is wrong.

I am interested in this project because according to the Pew Research Center African Americans show to have the highest level of scriptural literalism and are the less progressive on issues of sexuality. Unfortunately the Pew Research doesn't control for sexuality, and I want to know how is the gay male portion of the African American community situated in this data. Also, I'm curious as to how this marginalized sexuality demographic navigate spaces characterized by biblical literalism and anti homosexual.

Related:
AALCI 2014

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Josalynn Smith's poster presentation


By Josalynn Smith

My project concerns the discourse that college-educated Black women are engaging with on the blogosphere. Analyzing blogs written by this demographic of Black women shows that blogs can be comparable to the literature Black women create. What connects the two mediums is the “African Aesthetic.”

Some critics consider novels written by Black women to be “autobiographies” because novel writing is privileged and the “African Aesthetic” roots the works of Black women writers in a personal truth. The “African Aesthetic” is seen on contemporary blogs; however, I hypothesize that the blogs are more candid about the authorship and the viewpoints of the writer than the offline print works from Black women. It seems as though the Internet gives Black women unforeseen agency that is not possible in print sources.

Related:
AALCI 2014

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Alesia Alexander's presentation


Alesia Alexander

For my AALCI project I chose to research white womens and black womens relationships in the 19th Century, specifically white women who were wives of slave owning husbands and enslaved African American women. I looked at these relationships through slave narratives, interviews, and scholarly essays and then used that information to analyze the modern day historical fiction novel Property by Valerie Martin. Through historical and scholarly texts and the historical fiction novel there are many instances of violence from white women inflicted on black women, even though this relationship is less acknowledged in history.

I became interested in this research because the dynamics of the plantation household is interesting to me, especially the relationships between the different people. I am interested womens relationships because romantic interracial relationships are a hot topic in media today, but interracial/cross cultural friendships are not as visible. Investigating this research and learning about the mindset of some of these women sheds light on how these relationships were in the past and how future research could possibly relate to today's relationships between women.

Related:
AALCI 2014

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